OJT for the Future

OJT for the Future – Meeting the Demand of Job Training in America

In my last blog (Meeting the Demand of Job Training in America), I showed how occupations with low hire rates and a high number of openings represent the best opportunity for job seekers and training companies. Now, I’m going to look a little bit deeper into the job expansion trends to see how these conclusions match expectations for the year 2024.

I looked at two different measures of job expansion; 1) percentage of job growth and 2) the magnitude of job growth. I also look at the On-the-Job Training (OJT) needs for the high percentage and high magnitude growth occupations.

Table 1 provides the data for the top 30 occupations (out of 800) on the percentage of expected growth. Occupations in the health care and social assistance category have the lion’s share of entries in the top 30. This must be due in large part to demographic shifts (the baby boomer effect), but it can also reflect a shift in our general economy to one that is more service-oriented.

Table 2 provides the data for the top 30 occupations (out of 800) on the magnitude of expected growth. Again, the health care and social assistance category is well represented. The personal aide’s occupation and home health aides occupation show up on both lists. A variety of nursing-related occupations show up on both lists.

It’s worth noting that these trends only go through 2024. Job seekers should note that technological disruptions can dramatically affect these trends when one considers a longer event horizon (10-20 years).

For example, driverless vehicles can dramatically impact the commercial driver’s occupation, while advanced software and robotics can have an impact on many of the other listed occupations.

Technology trends can spawn occupation growth.

For example, the statistician’s occupation (currently the #8 occupation with the largest percentage increase) is one such occupation that is on the rapid rise due to the technology trend towards ‘big data’. In another example, advancements in renewable energy technologies are reflected by the high percentage growth of two listed occupations (wind turbine service technician and solar photovoltaic installers).

In a future blog, I’ll provide some additional insights into those occupations that can be negatively disrupted by trends in technology and those occupations that can emerge as new growth occupations because of technology.

The occupations listed in the two tables below can be broken down into more specific occupations for which OJT is, or can be, offered. Here at OJT.com, we’ll be mapping the OJT training needs for specific high performing occupations to the institutions that provide the associated training.

Training providers should note the expanding occupations with expected needs for On-the-Job Training (OJT), for that portends a requirement to expand OJT services as well.

Table 1 Fastest growing occupations, 2014 and projected 2024 (Numbers in thousands)

Job Title New Jobs Percent
Increase
Average
Wage
Typical on-the-job training
Wind turbine service technicians 4.8 108.0 $52,260 Long-term on-the-job training
Occupational therapy assistants 14.1 42.7 $59,010 None
Physical therapist assistants 31.9 40.6 $56,610 None
Physical therapist aides 19.5 39.0 $25,680 Short-term on-the-job training
Home health aides 348.4 38.1 $22,600 Short-term on-the-job training
Commercial Divers 1.6 36.9 $49,090 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Nurse practitioners 44.7 35.2 $100,910 None
Physical therapists 71.8 34.0 $85,400 None
Statisticians 10.1 33.8 $80,500 None
Ambulance drivers and attendants, except emergency medical technicians 6.5 33.0 $23,850 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Occupational therapy aides 2.7 30.6 $28,330 Short-term on-the-job training
Physician assistants 28.7 30.4 $101,480 None
Operations research analysts 27.6 30.2 $79,200 None
Personal financial advisors 73.9 29.6 $90,530 Long-term on-the-job training
Cartographers and photogrammetrists 3.6 29.3 $62,750 None
Genetic counselors 0.7 28.8 $74,120 None
Interpreters and translators 17.5 28.7 $46,120 Short-term on-the-job training
Audiologists 3.8 28.6 $75,980 None
Hearing aid specialists 1.6 27.2 $50,250 None
Optometrists 11.0 27.0 $106,140 None
Forensic science technicians 3.8 26.6 $56,750 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Web developers 39.5 26.6 $66,130 None
Occupational therapists 30.4 26.5 $81,910 None
Diagnostic medical sonographers 16.0 26.4 $69,650 None
Personal care aides 458.1 25.9 $21,920 Short-term on-the-job training
Phlebotomists 28.1 24.9 $32,710 None
Ophthalmic medical technicians 9.1 24.7 $35,530 None
Nurse Midwives 1.3 24.6 $99,770 None
Solar photovoltaic installers 1.4 24.3 $39,240 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Emergency medical technicians and paramedics 58.5 24.2 $32,670 None
Footnotes: Data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Source: Employment Projections program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table 2 Occupations with the most job growth, 2014 and projected 2024 (Numbers in thousands)

Job Title New Jobs Percent
Increase
Average
Wage
Typical on-the-job training
Personal care aides 458.1 25.9 $21,920 Short-term on-the-job training
Registered nurses 439.3 16.0 $68,450 None
Home health aides 348.4 38.1 $22,600 Short-term on-the-job training
Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food 343.5 10.9 $19,440 Short-term on-the-job training
Retail salespersons 314.2 6.8 $22,680 Short-term on-the-job training
Nursing assistants 262.0 17.6 $26,590 None
Customer service representatives 252.9 9.8 $32,300 Short-term on-the-job training
Cooks, restaurant 158.9 14.3 $24,140 Moderate-term on-the-job training
General and operations managers 151.1 7.1 $99,310 None
Construction laborers 147.4 12.7 $33,430 Short-term on-the-job training
Accountants and auditors 142.4 10.7 $68,150 None
Medical assistants 138.9 23.5 $31,540 None
Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners 136.3 5.8 $24,190 Short-term on-the-job training
Software developers, applications 135.3 18.8 $100,080 None
Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand 125.1 5.1 $25,980 Short-term on-the-job training
First-line supervisors of office and administrative support workers 121.2 8.3 $54,340 None
Computer systems analysts 118.6 20.9 $87,220 None
Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses 117.3 16.3 $44,090 None
Maids and housekeeping cleaners 111.7 7.7 $21,820 Short-term on-the-job training
Medical secretaries 108.2 20.5 $33,730 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Management Analysts 103.4 13.6 $81,330 None
Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers 98.8 5.5 $41,340 Short-term on-the-job training
Receptionists and information clerks 97.8 9.5 $27,920 Short-term on-the-job training
Office clerks, general 95.8 3.1 $30,580 Short-term on-the-job training
Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific products 93.4 6.4 $57,140 Moderate-term on-the-job training
Stock clerks and order fillers 92.9 4.9 $23,840 Short-term on-the-job training
Market research analysts and marketing specialists 92.3 18.6 $62,560 None
First-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers 88.5 9.9 $31,480 None
Electricians 85.9 13.7 $52,720 Apprenticeship
Maintenance and repair workers, general 83.5 6.1 $36,940 Long-term on-the-job training
Footnotes: Data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Source: Employment Projections program, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

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One thought on “OJT for the Future

  1. Avatar
    Sherry says:

    You are probably right. The best mathematicians simply enjoy expanding the frontier of human intelligence as well as passing it on to the next generation, away from the public radar. Thanks for another important lesson for me:)

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