America's Resource for On-the-Job Training

Ameritech College of Healthcare, as written in the name, is another institution geared toward educating workers of the health care industry. Also, one of the community colleges in Utah on the higher end of graduation rates. Just a few percent difference in graduation rates from Provo college.

The programs they offer are, Associate of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, B.S in Nursing (Accelerated BSN), B.S in Nursing (RN to BSN), M.S in Nursing (Direct entry), M.S in Nursing (BSN to MSN), and Occupational Therapy Assistant.

Prospective Students

We know you have lots of choices when it comes to higher education. With so many options, finding the right fit for you can feel overwhelming. Let us help you out. Why not choose Snow College—where you can explore, learn, and discover at half the cost? Snow College is a residential junior college located in the beautiful mountain valleys of central Utah. Our small class sizes ensure that you get the help you need, when you need it. Your courses will be taught by experienced professors, not grad students, which means you get the best quality education possible. Our graduates leave Snow prepared to secure great jobs or pursue additional education.

At Snow, we know that there is more to college life than what happens in the classroom. After class is done, there are many options for recreation. We are just minutes away from incredible 4-wheeling, hiking, and biking trails. The great outdoors not your thing? That’s okay. We have tons of activities for you too. Dances, student clubs, service opportunities, sporting events, and did we mention free food nights? They are all part of our student life activities.

We know you have lots of choices when it comes to higher education. With so many options, finding the right fit for you can feel overwhelming. Let us help you out. Why not choose Snow College—where you can explore, learn, and discover at half the cost? Snow College is a residential junior college located in the beautiful mountain valleys of central Utah. Our small class sizes ensure that you get the help you need, when you need it. Your courses will be taught by experienced professors, not grad students, which means you get the best quality education possible. Our graduates leave Snow prepared to secure great jobs or pursue additional education.

At Snow, we know that there is more to college life than what happens in the classroom. After class is done, there are many options for recreation. We are just minutes away from incredible 4-wheeling, hiking, and biking trails. The great outdoors not your thing? That’s okay. We have tons of activities for you too. Dances, student clubs, service opportunities, sporting events, and did we mention free food nights? They are all part of our student life activities.

About Snow

Snow College was founded in 1888 as the Sanpete Stake Academy by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1900 it was renamed Snow Academy in honor of Lorenzo Snow, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and his cousin Erastus, who was instrumental in settling the Sanpete Valley.

The institution went through three more name changes in a seven-year period. In 1917, the academy era ended and the school became Snow Normal College. In 1922, officials renamed the school Snow Junior College only to change it one year later to Snow College. In 1931, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints divested itself of Snow College and it became a state supported institution.

Over the years, Snow College had been the educational, artistic, musical and sports center of Central Utah. Encouraged by Snow’s high academic standards and dedication to the pursuit of knowledge, thousands of graduates have gone on to earn higher degrees at colleges and universities throughout the country. Thousands of others have graduated from Snow fully prepared to find employment in a wide variety of fields.

The Basics

• Main campus is located in Ephraim, Utah – 120 miles south of Salt Lake City
• There are two campuses – one in Ephraim and another in Richfield, Utah
• Snow College serves the Six-County area in Utah including: Juab, Millard, Piute, Sanpete, Sevier and Wayne Counties. However, students from the Wasatch Front and throughout Utah attend and are welcome at Snow College

Resources

    • • Ephraim campus comprises 26 buildings – 14 academic, on 82 acres
    • • Found on Ephraim campus – Eccles Center for the Performing Arts (89,000 sq. ft including a concert hall and theatre), Activity Center (athletic activities, including swimming, for campus and community), art gallery located in the Humanities Building and Noyes Building (oldest building on campus was restored in 1999).
    • • Richfield campus comprises 7 buildings on 56 acres
    • • Found on Richfield campus – Sevier Valley Center (139,000 sq. ft. including an indoor arena, theatre and classrooms) and Administration Building – both facilities are used extensively for conferences
    • • There are six deans over six divisions and 35 departments at Snow College including: Business & Technology, Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Social & Behavioral Science and Career Technology Education
    • • Approxiatmely 350 faculty and staff

Enrollment

    • • 5,100+ undergraduates
    • • 55% female
    • • 45% male

College Profile

Located in Ephraim in the beautiful mountain-rimmed Sanpete valleys of central Utah just south of Provo, Snow College has been the right place for many students since its founding by Mormon pioneers in 1888. Every year, over 5,000 students attend Snow College with aims to transfer to four-year institutions or enter the workforce after earning a Bachelor of Music degree, an Associate degree, or one of the many certificates offered at the college.

Size
Because of the small size of Snow’s student body, students receive more personal attention and specialized help from professors and advisors. The result is Snow students are recruited and succeed better at Utah’s 4-year institutions more than any other junior college in the state.

Faculty
The mission of Snow College – to educate students, to inspire them to love learning and to lead them to serve, cannot be accomplished without an outstanding faculty. Snow professors are unencumbered by research unlike their counterparts at 4-year institutions. This allows Snow faculty to focus on teaching and ensuring that students acquire the knowledge and skills they’ll need academically and professionally.

Programs
Snow has ample areas of study for students – from Accounting to Zoology, and has developed a reputation as “state of the art” from university colleagues in such areas as science, premed and music.

Snow’s science department has earned a reputation for excellence nationwide. For example, over the past seven years 38 Snow students have taken the Pharmacy College Admissions Test. Twenty-five of them scored in the 95th percentile or higher (seven scored 99%). Thirty-one have been accepted into pharmacy schools.

Snow is one of only 23 2-year colleges accredited as members of the National Association of Schools of Music in the United States and the only 2-year school accredited in Utah. This means that Snow’s Horne School of Music meets the same national standards as the first two years of an accredited 4-year college and university.
Snow’s Horne School of Music features 12 student-performing groups – five choirs, three bands and two jazz ensembles.

In 2005, the National Association of Schools of Theatre awarded Snow’s theatre arts department full accreditation and membership. NAST has approximately 143 accredited institutional members and establishes national standards for undergraduate, graduate degrees and other credentials. Snow College joins Brigham Young University as the only other NAST-accredited institution in Utah and is one of only four junior colleges to achieve NAST accreditation. Snow’s theatre arts program produces four plays a year.

Student Life
Ninety percent of Snow students live in residence halls or off-campus apartments. Fortunately, Snow offers many opportunities for students seeking leadership, academic, athletic, musical or simply social experiences. There are over 43 student organizations, 18 academic clubs and 12 performance groups. Snow also offers 15 intramural sports to choose from and recreational facilities for activities such as swimming, tennis, racquetball, dance, bowling and weightlifting. Nearly all Snow students participate in at least one activity ranging from student government to intramural sports to the KAGE radio club.

Athletics
Snow provides varsity athletics in football, men’s and women’s basketball, women’s volleyball and women’s softball. In 1985, Snow’s football team won the national championship and has since won several bowl games. This year, the football team enters the season ranked eighth in the prominent junior college football poll. The men’s and women’s basketball teams have combined for several league championships. In 2003-04, the men’s basketball team tied for the Scenic West Athletic Conference regular season title.

Cost
An intimate learning environment with excellent instruction, programs, student life, and facilities is offered at the most affordable price in the state of Utah. Compare tuition, fees and living expenses with other schools and you’ll find Snow to be the best educational value anywhere. To further reduce the cost of education, Snow offers scholarships, financial aid and campus employment. For more information about costs and scholarships please call 1-800-848-3399 or visit www.snow.edu.

Badger Orientation

New Student Orientation is designed to help you get comfortable and confident on campus so that you are ready for your first day of classes. Orientation has moved online and can be found in Canvas. Please contact admissions if you need assistance logging in. Orientation can be completed on your own schedule, and should take less than one hour. It will be most helpful if completed before you arrive at campus, but may be done any time before September 1.

Human Resources

Our goal is to serve you by providing clear and accurate information regarding employee, employment, and payroll related services. In these pages you’ll find Human Resource announcements and news, benefit information, program information, policies, forms, current job opportunities, student jobs and the latest information. For general inquiries please contact us by email at email address for this person.

Snow College Historical Sketch

Founded in 1888 by Danish settlers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints for the purpose of educating themselves and their children, Snow College was first called Sanpete Stake Academy and was begun at the urging of Church leader Canute Peterson, who supported the church’s emphasis on education. Built entirely with local donations, including “Sunday Eggs,” the school had a rocky start as the locals struggled to finance their dream.

The Academy’s first principal, Alma Greenwood, was assisted by teacher Miss Carrie Henry. The first class of 150 students met on the top floor of the Co-op Store, the building which still stands today, located on the corner of Main Street and First North.

Mr. Greenwood resigned at the end of 1891 and was replaced by Principal George Christensen, who served only one year and left to continue his schooling. He returned twelve years later and became a teacher at the Academy.

From 1892 to 1921 Newton E. Noyes served as principal, giving his name to the still-occupied administration building. When Mr. Noyes began his years of service, the staff had grown to four full-time teachers and two part-time employees. Tuition for preparatory courses was $4.50 for fifteen weeks of study; for intermediate courses, the cost was $6.50 for fifteen weeks.

In 1900 financial woes sent Mr. Noyes to Church headquarters to plead for assistance for the school, and Church President Lorenzo Snow authorized $2,000 as that year’s appropriation. In gratitude, the Sanpete patrons named their school Snow Academy after Lorenzo Snow and, at his request, after another early pioneer, Erastus Snow. The name of the school was changed to Snow Junior College in 1922 and finally to its present name of Snow College in 1923.

Newton Noyes was followed as principal by Wayne B. Hales who served from 1921 to 1924. By this time the student body had grown to 339 pupils, but only 59 were in the college program. In the fall of 1923 plans developed to transfer the high school students to the local board of education.

The next leader of Snow College was Milton H. Knudsen who served from 1924 until 1933. When the high school students were transferred to the local board of education, Snow accepted the first four grades of elementary school in return. President Knudsen strengthened the college’s normal school by providing each student with valuable experience in teaching under the supervision of skilled instructors. In the last year of President Knudsen’s administration – owing to financial difficulties caused by the Depression – the church deeded Snow College to the state.

Knudsen was followed by Dr. I. Owen Horsfall, who served from 1933-1936. Dr. Horsfall stressed self-improvement of the faculty, and in the summers of 1935 and 1936, 70 percent of the teachers were doing graduate work. During Dr. Horsfall’s administration the teacher-training programs were dropped from all two-year schools in the state. As a result, Snow’s curriculum was reduced from twenty courses to five, and many feared the college wouldn’t be able to survive.

In spite of the changes, Snow received strong support from the community and experienced exceptional leadership under another long-term director, James A. Nuttall (1936-1953). A celebration of its first fifty years in 1938 showed the remarkable characteristics of this small school: a strong and loyal alumni group which boasts a long list of distinguished people, dedicated faculty who were willing to sacrifice salaries for the school’s survival, and a pervading feeling that those affiliated with the school have called the “Spirit of Snow.”

In 1951 Snow became a branch of Utah State Agricultural College (now USU) in Logan. It remained an adjunct to USU until 1969 when it became a member of the State System of Higher Education.

Following James A. Nuttall came Lester B. Whetten, who led the institution from 1953-1956. Director Whetten’s emphasis for Snow, as stated in the 1953-54 school catalog, was in accentuating the school’s role as a community college for the benefit of every citizen within a fifty-mile radius to “improve his education and broaden his satisfaction with life.”

Whetten’s successor, J. Elliot Cameron, came to Snow from the position of Superintendent of Schools in Sevier County. During Director Cameron’s term (1956-58), the faculty grew to twenty-six teachers. Although the campus was still contained on one block, plans were made to expand the campus and the student body size.

When Cameron left, the faculty’s choice, Floyd S. Holm, was appointed director in 1958; a popular and effective leader, he served until 1974. The school made a significant transition from fighting for its existence to stressing academic excellence. School and community pride in Snow’s reputation was at an all-time peak.

The next president was J. Marvin Higbee. He served from 1974 until 1982. The Higbee era was seen as a time of change, appraisal, and growth. Vocational courses were expanded, and the Snow Activity Center—the largest such facility provided in Utah to a two-year college—was funded. The campus expanded to the west of Ephraim with plans for a Career Center.

Under President Steven D. Bennion (1982-1989) the funding for the Career Center was obtained, and the Snow College Foundation was formed to acquire needed funds for the college and its students. The college celebrated its Centennial with a year of activities honoring alumni and recognizing the successes and accomplishments of the first one hundred years. The school continued to build its reputation on an outstanding academic offering, and Snow became the first two-year school in the state to offer an Honors Program. The school was also recognized for its theatre productions, forensic awards, music contributions, outstanding journalism, noteworthy programs in English as a Second Language, and athletic accomplishments—including the 1985 National Championship football team.

Gerald J. Day continued to lead the school through significant change. During his administration (1989-2001), the Humanities Building was renovated, and the Lucy A. Phillips Library was remodeled. The Greenwood Student Center was also built, and the Noyes Building was restored. In addition to increasing the number of physical facilities, President Day was also helpful in increasing the number of employment and educational opportunities for the people of Central Utah. House Bill 114 officially made the former Sevier Valley Applied Technology Center a branch campus of Snow College. Snow College South became the Applied Technology Division of the college, and a new Fine Arts Division was created.

During President Michael T. Benson’s tenure (2001-2006), a home was needed for the newly created Fine Arts Division. President Benson secured private funding for the new performing arts facility, the George S. and Delores Doré Eccles Center. With this major addition to campus, five other facilities (the Old Gym, the old Social Science Building, the Varsity House, the old theater, and the old South Ward Music Building) were demolished. Fundraising efforts were a focus during President Benson’s presidency, and substantial, private donations to the college reached historical levels. Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel visited the college, and academic excellence was emphasized.

That tradition of excellence continued while Scott L. Wyatt served as president. (2007-2014).  He led the college in growth initiatives and strategic planning, including approval of the college’s first four-year degree, implementation of technology-enhanced classrooms, construction of Karen H. Huntsman Library, and a new 400-bed student housing complex. In spite of a national economic downtown, he championed an aggressive marketing campaign, enhanced the college brand, and led the college to a 40% increase in student enrollment.

Gary L. Carlston embodied the “Spirit of Snow” during his time as president (2014-2019). He was known as a bridge-builder and collaborator. He worked to unify the Richfield and Ephraim campuses, emphasizing that the college is one institution with two campuses. Faculty and staff were particularly thankful for the historic appropriations he secured, which were used for compensation. The infrastructure on both campuses improved as well with the addition of the state-of-the-art Graham Science Center, the Bergesen Athletic Center, new fitness centers on both campuses, and the education wing of the Sevier Valley Center.

As the 17th president of Snow College, President Bradley J. Cook is keenly aware of his responsibility to those who have gone before. He says, “I am thrilled and honored to be in this position. Our challenge moving forward is to remain loyal to our past and our heritage, yet ever be faithful to our future. These cannot be mutually exclusive propositions.” Just as he stepped through an open door as an eighteen-year-old freshman in 1983, President Bradley J. Cook and the rest of the Snow College community now stand before other open doors. President Cook invites us all to remember the greatness of Snow and to reimagine what our future can be. As we cross the threshold into the Cook era at Snow College, we commit to celebrating and preserving the history of the school while embracing the opportunities tomorrow affords.

Rate us and Write a Review

Your Rating for this listing

angry
crying
sleeping
smily
cool
Browse

Your review is recommended to be at least 140 characters long

Show all timings
  • Monday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Tuesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Wednesday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Thursday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
  • Friday09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
building Own or work here? Claim Now! Claim Now!

Claim This Listing

Your request has been submitted successfully.

wpChatIcon